10 Shortcuts for MS Excel (Plus: Free Cheat Sheet)

Worksheet calculations by Microsoft Excel enable plenty of arithmetical operations with formulas and other features, no matter whether you need to produce a cost summary or statistics. There is a  detailed overview of keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Excel intended to help users tap into the full potential of this effective worksheet calculation program. We have picked ten handy and easy-to-learn keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Excel. And to help anyone unfamiliar with transitioning from ‘mouse to keyboard’ we’ve also compiled a  cheat sheet to print out and stick to the monitor.

The keyboard shortcuts apply to Excel 2016.

An article by the COMPAREX Editorial Team

1 Open a spreadsheet: You want to continue working on yesterday’s cost summary? Use the keyboard combination "Ctrl" + "O" to access the workbooks or saved files you most recently used.

Shortcut 1/10

Open a spreadsheet

2 Select an entire column or row in a worksheet: The correct column or row needs to be marked before performing an action. You can skip through two of the most frequent work steps almost for nothing by using the keyboard combination "Ctrl" + spacebar (select a column) and "Shift" + spacebar (select a row).

Shortcut 2/10

Select an entire column or row in a worksheet

3 Delete a column: Oops, there’s one column too many. Press "Ctrl" + "-" (minus) to delete the unnecessary column without taking your hands off the keyboard.

Shortcut 3/10

Delete a column

4 Format a cell by using the dialog box 'Format Cells': The keyboard combination "Ctrl" + "1" lets you format your cells that bit quicker, no matter whether it’s the font, the fill color, the border or the orientation.

Shortcut 4/10

Format a cell by using the dialog box 'Format Cells'

5 Open the tab 'Insert' and insert PivotTables, charts, add-ins, sparklines, pictures, shapes, headers, or text boxes: Plain excel tables look boring? The keyboard combination "Alt" + "N" (then choose a letter) opens the Insert tab, and each option on the task bar is assigned a letter. Pick your preferred letter to add images, formulas or text boxes to each table at the flick of a wrist.

Shortcut 5/10

Open the tab 'Insert' and insert PivotTables, charts, add-ins, sparklines, pictures, shapes, headers, or text boxes

6 Move to the next sheet in a workbook: What is the value on page three again? Use the keyboard combination "Ctrl" + "↓" (Page Down) to navigate easily through the sheets of a workbook.

Shortcut 6/10

Move to the next sheet in a workbook

7 Insert a function: Our favorite! No matter whether it’s 'SUM', 'IF' or 'DATE', the keyboard combination "Shift" + "F3" lets you add functions without that laborious switch between keyboard and mouse.

Shortcut 7/10

Insert a function

8 Copy the formula of the cell above: Press "Ctrl" + "U" to calculate the value of a cell with the formula in the one above. This keyboard combination saves you having to type in formulas again by hand.

Shortcut 8/10

Copy the formula of the cell above

9 Create an embedded chart of the data in the current range: Endless tables full of numbers can quickly become confusing. Diagrams are far more illustrative and help to demonstrate contexts and relations at a glance. Press "Alt" + "F1" or "Ctrl" + "Q" to produce an immediately accessible diagram in no time at all.

Shortcut 9/10

Create an embedded chart of the data in the current range

10 Save a spreadsheet: All done? Use the classic keyboard combination "Ctrl" + "S" to save your Excel calculations, tables and diagrams that little bit faster.

Shortcut 10/10

Save a spreadsheet

 Too many keyboard shortcuts at once? Our  compact cheat sheet, is always on hand to help refresh your memory. Simply print it out and stick it to your monitor.

Leipzig, 30.08.2016

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